Best Digital Pianos Under $1000: An Introduction to Intermediate Level Digital Pianos

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As a musician, it gets to a stage in your musical career where you have to think about upgrading your equipment.

Perhaps the gear you’re using is a little outdated, or maybe your skills have progressed to the point where you need to something that can better accommodate your abilities.

Or maybe you just want to treat yourself to something new.

Whatever the case may be, we’ve compiled a list of our favourite digital pianos under the $1000 mark.

A majority of the digital pianos in this list are geared towards intermediate players as we feel that they adequately suit their needs.

However, even as a beginner you can go ahead and grab one of these if they feel right by you.

So let’s dive into it and see what kind of digital pianos we can pick up for $1000.

Our Criteria

Key action

When considering the different options to feature on this list, we take a close look at the key action on the various digital pianos and the overall quality of the keys.

We specifically look at digital pianos with graded hammer action due to the fact that most intermediate players need a device with a realistic feel.

We also look at the keys more general and take into account the texture of the keytops and the material they are made from.

Sound quality

Sound quality is a major factor to consider when you’re buying any instrument, not just a digital piano.

With that being said, we take an in-depth look at the quality and loudness of the speaker system, as well as the sound engine/processors that the different pianos on this list use.

The different tones and sounds will also be considered in terms of quality as well as quantity.

Extra features

Let’s face it, when you fork out a big chunk of money you want to at least be guaranteed that you’re getting value for your money.

As such, we explore the different extra features that comes with each digital piano, and we see how they aid intermediate players, if at all.

Weight and Portability

Many intermediate players tend to be active musicians who gig, teach lessons or travel with their equipment for whatever reason.

As such, we take this into account and we look at which of these digital pianos is the most viable option for the gigging musician.

Pedals

To create a truly realistic and holistic playing experience, one will at one stage or another make use of piano pedals.

Most intermediate players are without a doubt experienced when it comes to using piano pedals and this is a feature we look at.

We will see which one of these digital pianos comes with its own pedals, and we will also take a look at the quality of the said pedals.

Stand

Most digital pianos can be placed on any flat surface and played.

However, a stand offers you greater control when as it is specifically designed and produced to support your digital piano.

For that reason, we also use this as part of our criteria when scrutinising the instruments on the list.

Budget

Let’s face it, you could have a checklist of everything you want from a digital piano, find the perfect one but then realise that you’re actually short of the asking price.

Your budget will essentially dictate the type of digital piano that you will be able to purchase.

Therefore, we take this into consideration as we make our way through the list

1st Best Choice
Casio PX-870 BK Privia Digital Home Piano, Black
2nd Best Choice
Yamaha Dgx660B 88-Key Weighted Digital Piano With Furniture Stand
Casio PX-780 Privia 88-Key Digital Home Piano with Power Supply, Black
Kawai ES110 Portable Digital Piano Black
Casio CGP-700BK 88-Key Digital Grand Piano with Color Touch Screen Display and Power Supply
Roland, 88-Key Digital Piano Black, FP-30 (FP-30-BK)
Keys
88
88
88
88
88
88
Polyphony
256 notes
192 notes
128 note
192 notes
128 notes
128 notes
Speakers
20W +20W
6W + 6W
20W + 20W
7W + 7W
20W + 20W
11W + 11W
Weight
75.6 lbs (34.3 kg)
46lbs. 5oz. (21kg)
69.45 lbs (31.5 kgs.)
26.5lbs (12kg)
26 lbs (11.7 kg); with stand – 56.7 lbs (25.7 kg)
31lbs (14.1kg)
Modes
Dual, Duet and Split
Split and Dual
Duet, Split and Layer
Dual, Split
Dual, Split, Duet
Split, Dual and Duet
1st Best Choice
Casio PX-870 BK Privia Digital Home Piano, Black
Keys
88
Polyphony
256 notes
Speakers
20W +20W
Weight
75.6 lbs (34.3 kg)
Modes
Dual, Duet and Split
2nd Best Choice
Yamaha Dgx660B 88-Key Weighted Digital Piano With Furniture Stand
Keys
88
Polyphony
192 notes
Speakers
6W + 6W
Weight
46lbs. 5oz. (21kg)
Modes
Split and Dual
Casio PX-780 Privia 88-Key Digital Home Piano with Power Supply, Black
Keys
88
Polyphony
128 note
Speakers
20W + 20W
Weight
69.45 lbs (31.5 kgs.)
Modes
Duet, Split and Layer
Kawai ES110 Portable Digital Piano Black
Keys
88
Polyphony
192 notes
Speakers
7W + 7W
Weight
26.5lbs (12kg)
Modes
Dual, Split
Casio CGP-700BK 88-Key Digital Grand Piano with Color Touch Screen Display and Power Supply
Keys
88
Polyphony
128 notes
Speakers
20W + 20W
Weight
26 lbs (11.7 kg); with stand – 56.7 lbs (25.7 kg)
Modes
Dual, Split, Duet
Roland, 88-Key Digital Piano Black, FP-30 (FP-30-BK)
Keys
88
Polyphony
128 notes
Speakers
11W + 11W
Weight
31lbs (14.1kg)
Modes
Split, Dual and Duet

Casio PX-870

Casio PX-870 BK Privia Digital Home Piano, Black
  • The AiR engine provides highly-accurate grand piano sounds with seamless dynamics for a remarkably expressive and powerful performance
  • The PX-870 features a variety of 19 instrument Tones, with the ability to layer and split them as needed. Touch Response - 3 sensitivity levels, Off
  • With a generous 256 notes of polyphony, you can rest assured that even the most complex performances will sound perfectly natural
  • The Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer Action II keyboard has an incredible feel and captures the dynamics of a performance with unparalleled speed and accuracy
  • The powerful 40-watt, 4-speaker system is designed to envelop the listener, audience and room with rich, detailed sound

The first digital piano we’ll be looking at is the Casio PX-870, a fully weighted 88 key digital piano from Casio’s famous Privia series of instruments.

Featuring a stunning cabinet style design, the Casio PX-870 is available in 3 different colour finishes and is relatively lightweight for a cabinet style build.

The design also features an in-built pedal board, just like a grand piano. Most digital pianos simply come with a cheap plastic sustain pedal.

Employing the use of retextured keys, the Casio PX-870 allows for a more realistic touch. The use of Casio’s famous Tri-sensor Scaled Hammer Action Keyboard II is a great addition as the keyboard uses real hammers as opposed to springs. This provides a very authentic playing experience.

With 256-note polyphony, you can rest assured that no notes will cut off while playing the Casio PX-870. After all, the higher he polyphony the better and there are many digital pianos on the market that are more expensive but lack this feature.

The Casio PX-870 contains some advanced features that intermediate players will appreciate such as the ‘Lid Simulator’ option. This allows players to mimic the sound changes that come with the various lid positions on a grand piano. This is accentuated perfectly thanks to the powerful and impressive 40W speaker system on the Casio PX-870.

Pros

  • The Casio PX-870 can be used as MIDI controller. A majority of intermediate – advanced players rely on this to record compositions in different programs.
  • The built-in pedal board on the Casio PX-870 means that users do not have to spend any more money buying an external pedal board system.
  • Intermediate and experienced players will be able to feel a difference on the Tri-sensor Scaled Hammer Action Keyboard II on the Casio PX-870 as it provides a much more realistic playing experience as opposed to competitor models.

Cons

  • The Casio PX-870 features an in-built recording option but only allows you to record two tracks at a time. This is disappointing given the hefty price-tag of this digital piano.
  • Casio PX-870 only features 19 in-built sounds. The sound library could stand to have more variety as even digital pianos under $500 tend to have more sounds and tones available.
  • If you’re looking to gig and travel with your digital piano then the Casio PX-870 might not be the best option seeing as you will have to disassemble and reassemble it every time you want to move it.

READ OUR FULL REVIEW OF CASIO PX870

Yamaha DGX 660

Yamaha Dgx660B 88-Key Weighted Digital Piano With Furniture Stand
  • The Pure CF Sound Engine faithfully reproduces the tone of a meticulously sampled and highly acclaimed Yamaha concert grand piano
  • GHS weighted action is heavier in the low register and lighter in the high, just like an acoustic piano; Data Capacity: Approx; 30,000 notes for 1 user song
  • Score Display puts music notation of MIDI songs on the screen, helping you play your favorites by following the bouncing ball
  • The Piano Room lets you choose from a variety of pianos and acoustic settings to create your own personal piano environment
  • The 6 track recorder allows you to capture your performances and song ideas, then add additional layers to spice up your pieces

Yamaha is a household name in the world of instruments and electronics. It is one of the most popular musical brands in existence. As such, the next digital piano we look at is the Yamaha DGX-660, a truly fascinating build available in two colour finishes.

Offering 88 fully weighted keys, the Yamaha DGX-660 makes use of Graded Hammer Standard (GHS) action whereby the keys in lower octaves feel heavy to the touch and they get progressively lighter as you move up the keyboard, a feature that is found in acoustic pianos.

With a staggering 554 in-built sounds, the Yamaha DGX-660 blows away its competition in this department as it offers users a multitude of tones. Furthermore, you can equalize these sounds and also apply effects such as reverb, chorus etc until you are happy with the final result. Very few digital pianos offer this level of control in terms of customising your sound.

The Intelligent Acoustic Control (IAC) function of the Yamaha DGX-660 means that sound quality produced by the speakers will not degrade. Not all digital pianos feature dedicated sound functions to this extent.

The Yamaha DGX-660 allows for internal recording of songs. It can accommodate up to five songs, and each song can have as many as five tracks. This is significantly more than some of the digital pianos in this list, and some of those cost almost twice as much as the DGX-660.

Pros

  • The Yamaha DGX-660 is significantly less expensive than many of its competitors within this price range. If you have budget restrictions then this is a fantastic option.
  • With over 554 in-built sounds, the Yamaha DGX-660 offers and expansive sound collection that will allow you to experiment with a variety of sounds.
  • The Yamaha DGX-660 features several connectivity options that allow for users to connect to external devices such as speakers, monitors, computers etc

Cons

  • Weighing in at 46.3lbs (21kg), the Yamaha DGX-660 is a relatively weighty instrument. Whilst it can be moved around if need be, the bulky nature of the item means that this will be rather tasking and may not suit the gigging musician.
  • Despite being packed with connectivity options, most of these are located on the rear panel of the Yamaha DGX-660 and some users my find this to be an issue in terms of accessibility.
  • The overall display of the control panel can look somewhat cluttered and some users have gone to comment that it is a bit overwhelming. However, most experienced players would have some knowledge of how to navigate around this so it should not be a dealbreaker.

READ OUR FULL REVIEW OF YAMAHA DGX660

Casio PX-780

Casio PX-780 Privia 88-Key Digital Home Piano with Power Supply, Black
  • The AiR engine provides highly-accurate grand piano sounds with seamless dynamics for a remarkably expressive and powerful performance
  • The Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer Action II keyboard has an incredible feel and captures the dynamics of a performance with unparalleled speed and accuracy
  • 250 instrument tones from strings to brass to drums are built-in, and you can store your favorite splits and layers for live performance
  • Also has 180 drum patterns with full auto accompaniment and a 17 track recorder for composing your own songs
  • Ready for the stage or studio, ¼" audio outputs easily connect the PX-780 to recording and sound reinforcement equipment

Another digital piano from Casio’s beloved Privia range makes it onto this list and this one if the Casio PX-780.

Employing the use of an 88-key fully weighted keyboard, the Casio PX-780 provides users with a comparatively realistic playing experience. The keys are simulated ebony and ivory keytops which in turn produce less unwanted noise. This is a plus seeing as many digital piano makers still employ the use of plastic keys. Tri-sensor Scaled Hammer Action II keyboard also adds to the overall playing experience.

Casio’s award winning AiR (Acoustic and Intelligent Resonator) sound system is a major factor worth considering in terms of buying the Casio PX-780. It provides unparalleled sound quality that the more experienced player will appreciate. The dual 20W speaker system ensure that the sound is audible enough when playing.

The cabinet style design of the Casio PX-780 means that it comes with an integrated pedal board system. This saves you a decent sum in having to purchase an external system, and also adds to the attractive look and finish of the digital piano. The cabinet design is advantageous as it provides a deeper and more resonant sound akin to that of an acoustic piano.

One of the more unique features of the Casio PX-780 is the in-built recording feature which allows you to record up to 17 tracks per song. This is astounding seeing as many digital pianos do not allow for more than five tracks. You can also store up to five songs at a time whereas competing models only accommodate for two tracks at a time.

Pros

  • As a producer and composer, I personally love the fact that you can seamlessly record your ideas and musings on the Casio PX-780 without necessarily having to connect to external devices.
  • For an instrument of this cost, one would expect to have several sounds to choose from and the Casio PX-780 does not disappoint in this department. It comes with over 250 in-built sounds to choose from.
  • The Casio PX-780 is a truly stylish instrument with its contemporary take on the classic cabinet style pianos.

Cons

  • If you intend to travel and use your digital piano on the road then the Casio PX-780 amy not be the greatest option as it weighs in at a whopping 68.34lbs (31.5kg) when fully assembled.
  • The Casio PX-780 is somewhat costly and there are indeed several more inexpensive options within this price range.

READ OUR FULL REVIEW OF CASIO PX780

Kawai ES110

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Kawai ES110 Portable Digital Piano Black
  • "Harmonic Imaging sound technology 88-key piano sampling Responsive hammer compact action, 88 weighted keys 19 sounds, including eight exceptional piano sounds Bluetooth MIDI Dual and split keyboard...

The Kawai ES110 makes it onto this list for a variety of reasons which we will outline below. Firstly, it is one of the most lightweight options within this price range it is an astounding 26.46lbs (12kgs)! This means it makes the perfect companion for the on the go musicians.

With 88-keys fully weighted keyboard, the Kawai ES110 offers an extremely responsive overall playing experience which honestly feels like you’re playing a more expensive instrument.You also get a truly authentic playing experience thanks to the AHA IV- F keyboard, an important factor for an intermediate level digital piano.

The sound of the Kawai ES110 is arguably amongst one of the most realistic within this price range. Although there are only 8 different piano tones, users have the ability to adjust certain characteristics of the piano sound such as reverb, damper noise and even temperament. Whilst most beginner players may not consider this feature, more seasoned pianists will appreciate its inclusion.

Although it doesn’t feature the loudest speaker system in the world, the Kawai ES110 offers amazing clarity whilst still maintaining a rich and resonant tone while playing. Furthermore, the EQ settings allows you to adjust to your preference. This feature will suit the intermediate – advanced player well.

Pros

  • Unlike most of the digital pianos within this price range, the Kawai ES110 is compatible with Bluetooth connectivity. This offers greater portability and flexibility when connecting to other devices.
  • The Kawai ES110 is remarkably light and extremely easy to transport. At only 26.46lbs (12kgs), it is genuinely one of the lightest digital pianos in the market. It would therefore suit intermediate players who also actively gig and teach lessons.
  • Some intermediate players may not feel the need of spending a large sum of money whilst they are still working on their skills. The Kawai ES110 is a quality instrument with a relatively pocket friendly price and it is worth the monetary outlay.

Cons

  • The keys on the Kawai ES110 are made of plastic and have a matte finish meaning that moisture absorption will not be great. Most intermediate players tend to have relatively long sessions and this is something worth considering.
  • Unlike some of the other digital pianos listed in this guide, the Kawai ES110 does not come with its own stand, meaning you will have to spend more money to purchase a separate stand.

READ OUR FULL REVIEW OF KAWAI ES110

Casio CGP-700

Casio CGP-700BK 88-Key Digital Grand Piano with Color Touch Screen Display and Power Supply
  • 5.3in Color Touch Interface display
  • Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer Action II 88 key keyboard with simulated Ebony and Ivory feel
  • Includes: stand with 40 watt speakers, sustain pedal, music rest, and power supply
  • Dedicated button for Grand Piano sound, as well as 550 instrument tones and effects
  • 3 year manufacturer extended warranty

At this point of the guide, it’s quite easy to see which brand name dominates the intermediate digital piano market. This time it is the Casio CGP-700, an instrument that’s been described as a ‘Compact Grand Piano’ (after all, that’s what the abbreviation CGP stands for).

Retailing at $799, the Casio CGP-700 is an 88-key fully weighted digital piano that features graded hammer action for a realistic playing experience. What we love about the CGP-700 is that it makes use of a 3-sensor system under each key while most digital pianos only have 2 sensors. As a result, you can expect a much more expressive playing experience from this device. Furthermore you can adjust the touch sensitivity to your preference.

With an intermediate digital piano, users expect the said instrument to have a variety of different sounds and tones available. After all, you may as well get as much value for your money as you can. The Casio CGP-700 delivers in this department as it offers 550 instrument sounds. There are some digital pianos that cost twice as much as the CGP-700 but do not offer nearly as many sounds.

The sound system on the Casio CGP-700 is quite interesting as it has speakers on the actual digital piano as well as in-built speakers on the piano stand. In total, it is a 40W speaker system and it promises audio clarity thanks to the MXi (Multi-Expressive Integrated) sound processor.

Pros

  • The Casio CGP-700 offers 128-note polyphony to its users, this means that you can rest assured that no notes will be cut off no matter how intricate your pieces are.
  • Without its stand, the Casio CGP-700 weighs 24.25lbs (11.7kg) which makes it one of the lightest and most easily portable options in this price range. Most gigging musicians will appreciate the lightweight nature of this machine.
  • The Casio CGP-700 offers MIDI recording and allows users to record up to 16 tracks in each song. This is a fantastic feature as it allows for you to create and record full compositions without much of a fuss.

Cons

  • Despite the cabinet style design, the Casio CGP-700 does not feature a built-in pedal board. Instead it comes with an external sustain pedal which truthfully does not feel realistic in any way.
  • With it’s price tag, Casio CGP-700 may not be your first choice pick if you are strapped for cash.

READ OUR FULL REVIEW OF YAMAHA CGP700

Roland FP-30

Roland, 88-Key Digital Piano Black, FP-30 (FP-30-BK)
  • Rich, responsive tone from Roland’s renowned Supernatural Piano sound engine
  • 88-note PHA-4 Standard keyboard provides authentic piano touch for maximum expression
  • Powerful amplifier and stereo speakers deliver impressive sound
  • Headphones output and quiet keyboard action allow you to enjoy playing at any time without disturbing others
  • Compact and lightweight body for easy mobility in and out of the home, studio, or classroom

As far as brands go, Roland has always been a personal favourite thanks to the quality builds they produce. This is no different when it comes to the Roland FP-30, an 88-key digital piano with a fully weighted keyboard featuring Roland’s PHA-4 Standard action. This along with five sensitivity options allows for a realistic playing experience that beats most of the competing models.

With Roland’s superNATURAL Sound technology, you get a rich and vibrant sound from the Roland FP-30 that does not degrade or affect the real acoustic piano samples used for this digital piano. The FP-30 makes use of full length samples instead of multi-layered samples. This means there is a smoother transition which allows for a refined sound when playing. Most beginners may not notice the difference but seasoned piano players will be able to tell.

In terms of the in-built features, the Roland FP-30 offers one track MIDI recording and further allows users to play MIDI and WAV files from external devices such as flash drives. Most competing pianos in this range do not offer this feature. Another fantastic feature is bluetooth connectivity.

With 2 x 11W speakers, the Roland FP-30 is loud enough for practice sessions and small gigs without having to employ external amplifiers. If you would prefer a more quiet and private practice session then it also offers two headphone jacks.

Pros

  • When it comes to the keyboard, the Roland FP-30 is one of the most realistic instruments to play and it will definitely suit the needs of the intermediate player.
  • The Roland FP-30 not only feels realistic, but it also sounds very realistic. Not many people would be able to tell the difference if they were to close their eyes and play the FP-30 side-by-side with an acoustic piano.
  • The use of ivory textured keys separates the Roland FP-30 from its competitors as many rival models still make use of plastic keys.

Cons

  • The one track recorder option offered by the FP-30 is not good enough and should offer more tracks. Some models within this price range offer up to 16 tracks per recording.
  • Although a sustain pedal is included with purchase of the Roland FP-30, the truth is that it does not feel realistic and the pedal would better suit beginner players. As such, intermediate – advanced players may want to explore alternative options.

READ OUR FULL REVIEW OF ROLAND FP30

Casio PX-770

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Casio PX-770 BK Privia Digital Home Piano, Black
  • The AiR engine provides highly-accurate grand piano sounds with seamless dynamics for a remarkably expressive and powerful performance
  • The Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer Action II keyboard has an incredible feel and captures the dynamics of a performance with unparalleled speed and accuracy
  • Includes a powerful stereo amplification system offering an optimal listening experience that is crystal-clear across the entire audio spectrum
  • Duet Mode splits the piano into two equal pitch ranges, allowing a student and teacher to sit at the same instrument
  • Concert Play allows you to play along with ten recordings of well-known orchestral pieces

Another Privia series piano from Casio makes it onto the guide once again. The fact that there are three models from the Privia range on one guide should say all you need to know about these quality instruments.

The Casio PX-770 features 88-keys fully weighted keyboard with the keys being weighted by actual hammers rather than springs. As an intermediate – advanced player, graded hammer action should be a factor when choosing your next instrument. This along with the triple sensor detection system provides for a phenomenal playing adventure.

One of our favourite features on the Casio PX-770 is the concert play option which allows for users to play along to 10 different orchestra songs. This means you can jam by yourself and also try out new techniques while playing along to a backing track.

The Casio team makes us of lossless audio technology in the Casio PX-770. As such, it recreates the rich and hearty tone of an acoustic piano while maintaining amazing audio clarity all throughout. Furthermore, the AiR engine provides extremely accurate grand piano sounds for maximum dynamic expression.

Pros

  • The cabinet style design of the Casio PX-770 is rather eye catching. Although, technically, looks don’t matter, this is an absolutely beauty as far as digital pianos go.
  • Users can add a variety of effects such as reverb and chorus when playing the Casio PX-770. Surprisingly, some competing models fail to offer these features.
  • With a variety of connectivity options such as MIDI and normal ¼” jacks. The Casio PX-770 therefore makes it extremely simple to connect to external devices as well as record your performances while playing.

Cons

  • Despite a rather demanding asking price, the Casio PX-770 only has 19 sounds. Truthfully, this is a bit of a let down as we expected more in this category.
  • The Casio PX-770 will not suit the average gigging musician due to the sheer weight of the digital piano once it is fully assembled. Furthermore, it is not practical to assemble and disassemble it every time you have a show.
  • The speakers housed in the Casio PX-770 are not the loudest in the market and should you wish to perform in a crowded or large environment then connecting to an external amplifier will be a necessity.

READ OUR FULL REVIEW OF CASIO PX770

Yamaha P-125

Yamaha P125 88-Key Weighted Action Digital Piano With Power Supply And Sustain Pedal, Black
  • A fully weighted digital piano with 88 full sized piano style keys
  • GHS weighted action is heavier in the low keys and lighter in the high keys, just like an acoustic piano
  • The pure CF sound engine faithfully reproduces the tone of the acclaimed Yamaha 9 feet CFIIIS Concert Grand piano; Tempo Range: 5 to 280
  • Split Mode lets you play a different voice with each hand; Tuning : 414.8 440.0 to 446.8 Hz
  • USB to host connectivity with MIDI and audio transfer means you only need 1 Cable to connect to your music making software

One more Yamaha device manages to make it on to this list, the Yamaha P-125; a nifty digital piano from Yamaha’s ‘portable’ series. What makes this particular digital piano so portable is the fact that is only weighs 24.25lbs (11.8kg) thus making it very easy to carry around. As we’ve observed, some of the pianos on the list weigh almost three times as much!

With four sensitivity options available, the Yamaha P-125 is a step above many competitors as most only offer three sensitivity options. The 88-keys fully weighted keyboard is graded thus providing a similar touch and feel to that on an acoustic piano.

One of the most stand out features of the Yamaha P-125 is the Stereophonic Optimizer option which adjusts the spacing of the sound while playing with headphones. What this does is to truly immerse you in the playing experience. Furthermore, the four layer sampling used on the P-125 mean that the sound is richer and more natural as opposed to other digital pianos.

Unlike many of the models in this guide, the Yamaha P-125 does not feature a cabinet style design and as such it does not come with its own stand. It however does include a sustain pedal and a pedal unit connector that would allow for the connection of a 3-pedal unit.

Pros

  • The Yamaha P-125 employs the use of the ‘Table EQ’ feature. Simply put, when the digital piano is placed on a surface such as a table, the internal speakers are optimised to achieve the ideal sound.
  • There are now several digital pianos that allow users to connect to a variety of apps dedicated specifically to the device. The Yamaha P-125 is one such digital piano and it allows for users to connect to the Smart Pianist app (Google Play, App Store) for quicker control.

Cons

  • Some buyers of the Yamaha P-125 have complained that some of the keys get stuck or do not produce any sound. As such, it’s recommended to test out the keys as soon as you can so as to ascertain if there are any issues.
  • Although it is not necessarily a deal-breaker, the Yamaha P-125 does not offer bluetooth connectivity. It is worth noting that there are several other models on this list that offer this feature.

READ OUR FULL REVIEW OF YAMAHA P125

Conclusion

As your skills improve, your need for better equipment also grows. You could argue that these two go hand-in-hand as you will need a device that matches your playing ability. Whilst the gear does not necessarily make your a better performer, it does play a part in how well one can play. Although there are many more digital pianos under $1000, these are the ones we gravitated towards but you are free to explore more options.

With that having been said, picking one digital piano out of this list of eight is somewhat difficult. However, the stand out models would have to be the Yamaha DGX-660 and the Casio PX-870.

The Yamaha DGX-660 is the perfect companion for your home or studio setup, though it may not necessarily fit the gigging musician who’s always on the move. The sound engine used is excellent and mimics a grand piano very well. Additionally, if you have a budget of $1000 then you will end up saving a pretty penny as it retails at $683.

The Casio PX-870 costs around $900, this may vary with retailers. With greater control over your sound as well as excellent and realistic keys, this may be the intermediate player’s dream. With broad dynamic range and various sensitivity options, users will enjoy playing this instrument.

As always, these guides are simply meant to be guides. At the end of the day you will need to do some more research to see which piano will suit your needs.

For instance, gigging musicians and composers will have very differing criteria when selecting which digital piano to purchase, therefore you must adjust accordingly if you intend on getting value for your money.

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