Best Digital Pianos Under $2000: A Guide Geared to the Advanced Piano Player

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In this guide we’ll be taking a look at the best digital pianos under $2000. These machines will ideally suit the more advanced and experienced piano players who are looking for a digital piano that they will be using on an almost daily basis.

Pianos We Look At

Casio PX560BE 88-Key Digital Stage Piano, Blue, Digital Piano
1st Best Choice
Roland, Premium Portable Piano, 88-key (FP-90-BK), FP-90
Yamaha YDP143R Arius Series Console Digital Piano with Bench, Dark Rosewood
Roland Premium 88-key Digital Stage Piano (RD-2000)
2nd Best Choice
Kawai ES8 Digital Piano - Black
Korg C1 Air Digital Piano with Bluetooth - Brown
Keys
88
88
88
88
88
88
Polyphony
256 note
384 notes
192 notes
128 notes
256 notes
120 notes
Speakers
8W + 8W
25W + 25W; 5W + 5W
6W + 6W
N/A
15W + 15W
25W + 25W
Weight
26.5lbs (12kg)
52.02lbs (23.6kg)
83lbs (38kg)
47.9lbs (21.7kg)
49.6lbs (22.5kg)
77lbs (35kg)
Modes
Dual, Split, Hex Layer, Duet
Dual, Split
Dual, Duo
Split, Layer
Split, Dual, Four Hands
Partner, Dual, Split
Casio PX560BE 88-Key Digital Stage Piano, Blue, Digital Piano
Keys
88
Polyphony
256 note
Speakers
8W + 8W
Weight
26.5lbs (12kg)
Modes
Dual, Split, Hex Layer, Duet
1st Best Choice
Roland, Premium Portable Piano, 88-key (FP-90-BK), FP-90
Keys
88
Polyphony
384 notes
Speakers
25W + 25W; 5W + 5W
Weight
52.02lbs (23.6kg)
Modes
Dual, Split
Yamaha YDP143R Arius Series Console Digital Piano with Bench, Dark Rosewood
Keys
88
Polyphony
192 notes
Speakers
6W + 6W
Weight
83lbs (38kg)
Modes
Dual, Duo
Roland Premium 88-key Digital Stage Piano (RD-2000)
Keys
88
Polyphony
128 notes
Speakers
N/A
Weight
47.9lbs (21.7kg)
Modes
Split, Layer
2nd Best Choice
Kawai ES8 Digital Piano - Black
Model
Keys
88
Polyphony
256 notes
Speakers
15W + 15W
Weight
49.6lbs (22.5kg)
Modes
Split, Dual, Four Hands
Korg C1 Air Digital Piano with Bluetooth - Brown
Keys
88
Polyphony
120 notes
Speakers
25W + 25W
Weight
77lbs (35kg)
Modes
Partner, Dual, Split

Factors We Consider

Key Action

The first and foremost thing we consider when it comes to these digital pianos is the quality of the keys and the key action.

By now advanced players will be able to easily tell the difference in quality when it comes to the different pianos they play and there is a certain calibre of instrument that they will demand.

As such, we take time to narrow in on this and we discuss the materials used to make the keys as well as how they feel in comparison to other digital piano models in this price point.

We also take into account various factors such as the sensitivity levels that the different digital pianos have to offer.

Sound Quality

Most advanced players spend hours every day playing and practicing on their digital pianos.

As such, sound quality plays an important role when deciding which machine to add to your collection.

We therefore look at the overall quality of the sound, the speaker system, the polyphony and also the sound engine used by the various digital pianos in this list.

Extra Features

Given the price point and range of the pianos in this guide, we will also be judging the different models based on the extra features that they offer.

As these are advanced digital pianos, we expect them to offer more to the users in terms of sound customization, innovative functions etc

Weight and Portability

We take into account how portable the various digital pianos in this guide are.

Without a doubt most advanced players are looking to invest in an instrument that they will be playing often, and this includes at shows and various live performances.

So we will also keep the gigging musician in mind as we explore the various options presented before us.

Pedals

As these are relatively costly digital pianos, we look at whether or not pedals are included on purchase of the machines and we also take a close look at the quality of the pedals.

Whilst the pedals may not necessarily be the defining factor when choosing a digital piano, the fact is that we expect value for our money in terms of the build quality of the accessories that come with the different digital pianos.

Stand

Many advanced digital pianos come with their own in-built piano stands in a variety of styles, such as cabinet style digital pianos.

In this guide we also take this into account as the overall design will truthfully play a role in the instrument we pick.

Truthfully speaking, nobody wants a poorly designed machine.

Budget

With a rather hefty budget to splash on our digital piano of choice, we closely scrutinise the various digital pianos in this price-range to ensure that we are getting value for our money.

Simply because an item is more expensive than the other does not guarantee that it is a superior item.

As such, we take into account whether the digital pianos in this guide justify their asking prices or not.

Casio PX-560

Casio PX560BE 88-Key Digital Stage Piano, Blue, Digital Piano
  • The PX-560 features Casio's renowned Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer Action II keyboard, which accurately reproduces the touch and response of a concert grand piano.
  • Casio’s Multi-Dimensional Air (Acoustic and Intelligent Resonator) Sound Source delivers some of the best piano sounds you’ve ever heard.
  • Going beyond the traditional definition of a stage piano, the PX-560 includes 550 Tones, covering a huge variety of musical instruments and genres.
  • Size with stand : 52.0 x 11.5 x 5.8 (inches) / 52.0 x 11.5 x 30.4 (inches) [optional]

Aimed at the more advanced piano player, the Casio PX-560 is an excellent digital piano for a variety of reasons.

Featuring an 88-key fully weighted keyboard, the keys are made of simulated ebony and ivory keys and covered in textured material to provide a realistic playing experience. Most digital pianos make use of glossy finishes which in turn results in poor moisture absorption. The Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer Action Keyboard II on the Casio PX-560 makes use of real hammers instead of springs to mimic the graded action on real pianos.

The Casio PX-560 features the use of Casio’s award winning Multi-Dimensional Morphing AiR (Acoustic and Intelligent Resonator) sound source which allows for greater dynamic range while playing. The use of multi-layered samples creates a rich and realistic tone that advanced users will appreciate. The AiR sound source guarantees that the 650 different in-built tones will be heard at high quality.

If portability is something you’re considering, then Casio PX560 is the ideal instrument for the gigging musician due to the light-weight nature of this digital piano. Weighing in at 26.5lbs. It is very easy to transport and move around without tiring yourself out between different shows and performances. The design of the Casio PX-560 also makes use of a digital display with a touchscreen that makes navigating the different options extremely easy.

Some of our favourite features on the Casio PX560 includes the in-built EQ options. Advanced players will without a doubt appreciate this feature as it allows you to fine-tune the different tones to your preference.

Pros

  • The Casio PX560 features a staggering 256-note polyphony thus being an ideal piano for the more advanced and experienced piano players.
  • Sound customisation on the Casio PX-560 is extremely easy as players can make use of standard effects such as reverb, chorus etc and also make use of Digital Signal Processing effects such as distortion, compression, tremolo etc
  • With 650 in-built sounds, the sound library on the Casio PX-560 is extremely large and impressive.

Cons

  • Despite having the option to record while you perform, these recordings cannot be saved directly on to the Casio PX-560 and must be saved on an external device.
  • An instrument in this price range should include accessories that are also worth the same value and unfortunately the sustain pedal included in the Casio PX-560 is not good enough.

READ OUR FULL REVIEW OF CASIO PX-560

Roland FP-90

Roland, Premium Portable Piano, 88-key (FP-90-BK), FP-90
  • Authentic grand piano touch from the PHA-50 (Progressive Hammer Action with Escapement) keyboard, which combines wood and molded materials for great feel and lasting durability
  • Uses the latest Supernatural Piano Modeling technology instead of conventional sampling for a far richer, more detailed piano sound
  • Four speakers provide powerful and rich sound that’s ideal for intimate live performances
  • Premium selection of electric piano, strings, organ, and synth sounds, along with 30 registrations for storing favorite sound setups, including layers and splits for live performance
  • Connect your smartphone or tablet via Bluetooth wireless technology and play along with audio from your apps routed through the piano’s speaker system.Maximum Polyphony:384 notes

The Roland FP-90 is an award winning digital piano and for good reason. With 88 fully weighted keys, the keytops are made of wood and molded materials with a matte finish texture. This allows for better moisture absorption, not to mention that grip is also better. The Roland FP90 also makes use of the PHA-50 (Progressive Hammer Action) keyboard which means the keys are graded for a more realistic playing experience.

With 300 different instrument sounds to choose from, the Roland FP90 offers a great deal in times of variety. You can rest assured of fantastic audio clarity thanks to the famous Roland SuperNATURAL sound technology which makes use of physical modelling rather than sampling. The effect of this is that the Roland FP-90 produces sound which is rich and detailed.

One of the great features of the Roland FP-90 is the Piano Designer function that allows for players to edit different parameters that affect the overall sound. This allows you to change how the overall tone sounds. You can adjust the lid position, string resonance and even the cabinet resonance to get the perfect tone. Advanced users will appreciate these options due to the detailed changes they offer.

With 384-note polyphony the Roland FP-90 is the perfect companion for the advanced piano player as none of notes will be cut off while playing. This digital piano would therefore suit the virtuoso piano player.

Boasting up to four speakers with a total output of 60W, the Roland FP-90 has a powerful sound system for a digital piano and is loud enough to be heard when played alongside to a 12-person choir. The maximum volume of 107dB is extremely impressive and very few digital pianos within this price range can come even close to this output.

Pros

  • The Roland FP90 features a relatively realistic sustain pedal upon purchase. It is more lifelike in comparison to other competing digital piano sustain pedals.
  • Experienced piano players will be able to feel the difference in quality of the Roland FP-90 keytops and its competitors due to the material that is used..
  • Unlike most rival digital pianos within this range the Roland FP-90 mimics the escapement feature found in acoustic pianos for a more realistic playing experience.

Cons

  • Despite offering a WAV recording option, the Roland FP90 only offers one track recording. This is slightly disappointing given the price range and calibre of this digital piano.
  • The Roland FP-90 weighs in at 52.02lbs thus making it a relatively weighty digital piano. If you’re a gigging musician then this is definitely worth considering.

READ OUR FULL REVIEW OF ROLAND FP90

Yamaha YDP-143

Yamaha YDP143R Arius Series Console Digital Piano with Bench, Dark Rosewood
  • The Pure CF Sound Engine faithfully reproduces the tone of a meticulously sampled, acclaimed Yamaha 9 feet CFIIIS concert grand piano, allowing for incredibly dynamic and expressive playing
  • GHS weighted action is heavier in the low keys and lighter in the high keys, just like an acoustic piano
  • 50 classic piano songs are provided in the built in song memory as well as in a music book, "50 Greats for the Piano"
  • The Controller App for iOS devices adds a rich graphical user interface, allowing for quick and easy navigation and configuration
  • The 2 track song recorder allows players to practice one hand at a time, or record their next hit single. Half damper pedal control creates more detailed nuance and subtlety when playing, similar to...

The next advanced instrument we look at on this guide is the Yamaha YDP-143, cabinet style digital piano with a contemporary yet classic look to its design. There is a 3-pedal bar that is integrated in the design and this mimics the Sostenuto, Sustain, and Soft pedals that are found on an acoustic piano. These also allow for half pedaling, a feature that is rare on many digital pianos.

Offering 88-keys and graded hammer action, the Yamaha YDP143 which allows users to adjust the sensitivity of the keys. The keys feel realistic and they do not have the stiffness and resistance found on some other competing digital piano models. Worth noting is that the keytops have a glossy surface.

Advanced piano players will appreciate the tone of the Yamaha YDP-143 as it uses Pure CF Sound Engine sampling. It samples the Yamaha CFIIIS 9’ Concert grand piano which takes into account the different dynamic ranges thus allowing for more expressive playing. The piano samples used are rich and robust and the YDP-143 sounds quite realistic.

One of our favourite features of the Yamaha YDP-143 is the Intelligent Acoustic Control (IAC). This function allows for the digital piano to automatically adjust parameters such as bass and treble automatically while you play. This ensures a clean tone and sound throughout your playing. Without a doubt a stand-out feature for any piano within this range.

For a truly immersive playing experience, advanced users will appreciate the Stereophonic Optimizer feature on the Yamaha YDP-143. This is unique to Yamaha devices and it adjusts the spacing of the sound and separation from the piano which results in amazing surround sound quality.

Pros

  • With 192-note polyphony on offer, the Yamaha YDP143 will suit even the most advanced and technical piano player as they are guaranteed no notes will be cut off while playing.
  • Users can pair the Yamaha YDP-143 with the Yamaha Controller App to seamlessly navigate their device

Cons

  • Despite the keytops feeling relatively realistic, the glossy finish on the Yamaha YDP-143 is not the greatest when it comes to moisture absorption and may cause slipperiness.
  • The Yamaha YDP-143 should really feature more sounds and tones and unfortunately lacks in this department as competing digital pianos offer users a lot more.
  • Although it’s not necessarily a dealbreaker, the Yamaha YDP-143 does not feature an LCD display.

READ OUR FULL REVIEW OF YAMAHA YDP143

Roland RD-2000

Roland Premium 88-key Digital Stage Piano (RD-2000)
  • Next-generation RD stage piano with two independent sound engines and modern controller features
  • Dedicated acoustic piano sound engine with the latest Roland advancements provides authentic, richly detailed tone with full polyphony
  • Second Supernatural-based sound engine with 128-voice polyphony for electric pianos and additional sounds (compatible with RD-800 Live Sets)
  • Eight knobs with LED status indicators and nine sliders for real-time control of sounds and effects
  • Eight fully assignable zones for combining internal sounds and external sources (including software instruments)

Another Roland makes our list and this one is the impressive Roland RD-2000, a premium 88-key digital stage piano that is aimed towards the professional gigging musician. With a rather hefty price-tag, it is geared specifically towards advanced players.

The Roland RD-2000 features two independent sound engines, this in itself is quite remarkable and impressive for several reasons. One sound engine is dedicated to piano sounds to ensure authentic sound quality, while the other is dedicated to the rest of the tones thus providing an unrivalled listening experience in comparison to other pianos.

The keys on the Roland RD-2000 are made of a mixture of wood and ivory simulated plastic. These provide a realistic and authentic piano feel for the user and they offer great grip so you do not slip during performances. It also features the spectacular Roland PHA-50 hammer action keyboard for a graded effect in the keys.

The Piano Designer Function of the Roland RD-2000 is a great feature which allows for users to edit details such as string resonance, lid position etc to get the ideal tone for their performances. Most advanced users will be able to tell the subtleties between the different piano lid positions, so this is a welcomed addition in terms of features.

Featuring a staggering 1100 sounds and tones, the Roland RD-2000 quite literally blows away its competition in this department. The best aspect of this is that it offers you greater control over the various tones as you can tweak effects on the fly by using the faders and knobs.

Pros

  • The Roland RD2000 is able to express many subtle nuances thanks to the independent sound engine that caters for the different piano tones. This provides a very realistic sound while playing.
  • The sound library on the Roland RD-2000 is staggering as it offers users up to 1100. This is almost triple what most digital pianos in this price range offer.

Cons

  • The LCD display on the Roland RD2000 is quite small and users have commented that they expected something slightly bigger at this price point. This is worth considering if you will be using it on stage for live shows.
  • Despite its demanding price tag, the Roland RD-2000 does not feature any in-built speakers. This means users will need to rely on external amplification devices during any jam sessions.
  • The faders on the Roland RD-2000 feel rather delicate to the touch and could benefit from being redesigned and reinforced for greater durability.

READ OUR FULL REVIEW OF ROLAND RD-2000

Yamaha P-255

Yamaha P255B 88-Key Digital Piano
  • Voice (tone): tone number: 24, maximum polyphony: 256 sound. / Amplifier output: 15W 2
  • Size: frontage 1,333mm height 148mm depth 351mm / weight: 17.3kg
  • Power: AC100V (50 / 60Hz) / power consumption: 15W
  • Accessories: Japanese manual, power adapter, foot switch (FC4), music stand
  • Japanese manual URL (PDF):http://download.yamaha.com/api/asset/file/?language=ja&site=jp.yamaha.com&asset_id=61598&_ga=1.78377628.923151104.1421241422

The first thing one notices about the Yamaha P-255 is the stylish design that it features. Yamaha take on a contemporary twist and move away from the traditional box shape approach by putting curves on to the Yamaha P255. Reinventing the wheel is no easy fete but Yamaha manage to pull this off to an almost perfect level with this design.

The Yamaha P255 not only looks good but it also feels good to the touch. Thanks to the synthetic ivory keytops, the absorption on the keytops is good and users are assured they will not slip while performing. The Graded Hammer Standard (GHS) keyboard is also featured on the Yamaha P-255 and it mimics the graded action on acoustic pianos.

With 256-note polyphony and the use of Yamaha’s Pure CF Sound Engine, the Yamaha P255 has managed to recreate the variation and nuances of their rather famous CF concert piano. You are therefore guaranteed realistic sounding tones with this digital piano as there is a clear attention to detail.

Loaded with a variety of features, users can control the Yamaha P255from a handy app. This allows them to layer and split sounds as well as applying effects to existing sounds. It offers several options for sound customisation thus allowing you to refine your sound to your preference.

Pros

  • With a weight of only 38lbs, the Yamaha P-255 can be transported around between shows, jam sessions etc. It is one of the ‘lighter’ digital pianos in this guide.
  • The EQ sliders on the Yamaha P-255 offer greater control in terms of tone and sound quality as you can boost and cut frequencies according to your preference.
  • The Sound Boost feature of the Yamaha P-255 allows for a richer and fuller tone at the touch of a button. This features gives it more presence and allows for it to stand out even during live performances

Cons

  • The Graded Hammer key action on the Yamaha P-255 can sometimes feel stiff and heavy to the touch, especially when keys are played in a soft manner.
  • Although not necessarily a deal breaker, the lack of an LCD display may make it slightly difficult to navigate the options of the Yamaha P-255, even for advanced piano players.

READ OUR FULL REVIEW OF YAMAHA P255

Korg C1 Air

Korg C1 Air Digital Piano with Bluetooth - Brown
  • 88-key Digital Home Piano with 30 Sounds
  • Split/Layer Functionality
  • Built-in Speakers - Brown

Presented as a cabinet style digital piano, the Korg C1 Air is part of the Korg ‘home’ range of digital pianos. As such, the design features a built in stand and pedal board and when full assembled it weighs in at 77lbs thus meaning it may not be easy to transport around due to the logistics involved in such a process.

With graded hammer action, the 88-key fully weighted keyboard will suit advanced players due to the lifelike feel of the keys. Within this price range we expect all the digital pianos to feature weighted keys and the Korg C1 Air does not disappoint. With the high-range RH3 – Real Weighted Hammer Action 3 being part of this digital piano, the keyboard has a fast response and also medium weight.

The Stereo PCM system used in the Korg C1 Air provides a rather realistic sound. Although Korg do not have a specific acoustic piano that they sample from, they use multi-layered samples to allow for greater dynamic expression depending on how hard or how soft one strikes the keys.

The Korg C1 Air offers users a decent selection of piano voices and tones to choose from. The grand piano sounds are impressive and can further be improved on via organic elements such as the use of the different pedals as well as the velocity that you use to strike the keys.

Users can add various effects such as reverb to the different piano tones and sounds. However, these effects are somewhat limited and advanced users may feel the need for having more options at their finger tips.

Pros

  • The grand piano tones on the Korg C1 Air are note-worthy and advanced players with experience playing grand pianos will appreciate these tones.
  • The cabinet style design on the Korg C1 Air gives it a rather polished and superior appearance. This design looks professional and feels professional as well

Cons

  • If you’re looking for a digital piano for gigs then the Korg C1 Air may not be your first pick option. It would be cumbersome to have to assemble and dismantle it after every single performance and there would be much wear and tear.
  • The Korg C1 Air could honestly do with more features as many of the digital pianos in this price range offer more in this department. At the very least a revamped sound customisation option would be a welcome addition.

READ OUR FULL REVIEW OF KORG C1 AIR

Kawai ES8

Kawai ES8 Digital Piano - Black
  • Keyboard
  • Number of keys: 88 Key
  • Action: Graded-hammer
  • Key size: Full
  • Aftertouch / Velocity: Velocity Sensitive

Featuring Responsive Hammer 3 (RH3) keyboard action, the Kawai ES8 features one of the most realistic keyboards under the $2000 mark that we have played. The triple sensor system provides unparalleled accuracy and responsiveness while playing. Featuring simulated ivory keytops with a matte finish, the keys prevent slipping due to the fantastic moisture absorption they offer.

The Kawai ES8 makes use of the Harmonic Imaging XL sound engine found in the high-end digital pianos offered by Kawai. The sound engine replicates the important nuances found in acoustic pianos such as the string resonance, damper resonance etc. Few digital pianos mimic this as well as the Kawai ES-8.

Advanced users will appreciate the fact that they can edit various parameters of the piano sound in the Kawai ES8 so as to get the ideal tone. This includes damper resonance, decay time, half-pedal adjustment, temperament etc. This is one of the few digital pianos available that gives users this much control over the sound of their instrument. Users can also apply reverb effects to their desired degree.

With a total output of 30W, the Kawai ES8 speakers offer loud and clear sound when played through. One of our favourite features when it comes to the sound of the Kawai ES-8 is the Wall EQ setting which allows automatic optimization of the digital piano.

Pros

  • The Kawai ES8 is in a league of its own when it comes to sound customization as it offers users a host of different parameters that they can easily edit and tweak to their preferences.
  • Users can record their performances on the Kawai ES8 in MP3 or b format. Most digital pianos at this price point only offer one format.
  • The Kawai ES8 comes with a decent quality sustain pedal that allows for half-pedaling. This saves you money on having to buy external accessories.

Cons

  • The lack of Bluetooth connectivity in the Kawai ES8 is a slight let down given how many other competing models feature this option.
  • Although the piano tones sound great, the Kawai ES8 has a rather limited sound library and advanced users may feel this is a drawback.

READ OUR FULL REVIEW OF KAWAI ES8

Korg G1 Air

Korg G1 AIR Digital Piano Black
  • The sound of three of the world's finest concert grand pianos Multiple-layer samples for ultimate realism Digital recreation of grand piano string and damper resonance for ultimate realism RH3...
  • The breathtakingly detailed sound and dynamic feel of the G1 provides the pianist with every possible shade of musical expression
  • Based on decades of ground breaking piano sound technology from KORG, makers of the award-winning KRONOS, and a precisely engineered keyboard that responds perfectly from gentle pianissimo to powerful...
  • The technology of the G1 is so advanced you can even see it; the beautifully crafted slim-line cabinet of the G1 is a result of KORG’s unique history of musical instrument design and audio...
  • Finally, there is no compromise between superb sound and impeccable design

Right off the bat, the Korg G1 Air is an impressive digital piano as it makes use of Korg’s Real Weighted Hammer Action 3 (RH3) keyboard, the most realistic keyboard that Korg has to offer. It is extremely responsive to the touch, and uses a graded hammer action along with two-sensor technology for faster playing.

The different piano tones of the Korg G1 Air offer real attention to detail thanks to the use of multi-layered stereo samples from three different grand pianos as well as the use of the PCM Sound Generator. The sound engine takes into account the damper resonance, string resonance and the key-off simulation found in acoustic pianos.

With a total output of 80W, the speakers on the Korg G1 Air are amongst the loudest in this price range and they very easily beat out the competition. While you can easily connect to external sound devices, there is no pressing need for this unless you are playing a relatively large venue.

The overall cabinet design of the Korg G1 Air means that it comes with its own in-built stand and pedal board. This not only saves you money from buying external equipment, but they are also good quality builds that will suit advanced players. Furthermore, the pedal board supports half-pedaling for a more realistic playing experience when it is in use.

Pros

  • The Korg G1 Air makes use of Bluetooth technology and allows for audio data to be transferred from external devices directly on to the digital piano itself.
  • With editable features such as key-off and string resonance, the Korg G1 Air takes into account acoustic piano subtleties that several other digital pianos within this range tend to overlook.

Cons

  • At this price-point every single feature plays a role and unfortunately the Korg G1 Air keytops are made of plastic material rather than synthetic ebony and ivory keys.
  • The Korg G1 Air only features 120-note polyphony whereas other digital pianos on this list offer more than 256-note polyphony.

READ OUR FULL REVIEW OF KORG G1 AIR

Conclusion

At this price point, most evident that advanced users will generally have a solid idea of the kind of digital piano they want to buy. They have already identified the features they prefer and they know if they will be using the digital piano for gigs, jam sessions or simply have a home piano.

With that in mind, it is difficult to narrow down just one digital piano from this guide because they are all truly remarkable instruments. However, the two stand out pianos, in my personal opinion and suitable for my preferences, would be the Kawai ES8 and the Roland FP-90.

The Kawai ES8 offers a lot when it comes to sound customisation and gives you so much room to tweak and edit tones to your exact preference. The keyboard is also b and it blows away its competition in this department. The Roland FP-90 is a stunning instrument that also allows for detailed sound customisation.

With the criteria we have set out in this guide you can shop around to find an instrument that fits your exact needs without breaking a sweat.

Go ahead and drop us a comment and let us know which one of these you would personally pick and also tell us why.

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